Tasmania


IMGP0299Way down on the west coast of Tasmania, the world’s steepest steam-train railway takes travellers through mountainous rainforest between Strahan and Queenstown.

The current issue of Australian Traveller magazine (Nov-Dec-Jan issue) features my feature on the historic West Coast Wilderness Railway. All aboard!

PS: For more Tasmanian adventures, my story about leatherwood honey (Aug-Sep-Oct 17 issue) can bee found on the world wide hive at the Australian Traveller site.

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IMGP0086 DL Nant

The distillery at historic Nant Estate near Bothwell occupies an 1820s stone mill

What does Tasmania bring to mind? Devils, tigers, rainforest, convicts, MONA, Mures… You better add whisky to your list if it isn’t there already. The island state’s boutique distilling business is booming – I write about it in September’s Reader’s Digest.

IMGP0039 DL Redlands Robbie Gilligan

Robbie Gilligan of Redlands Distillery

Earlier this year I hit the Tasmanian whisky trail and met many a maker while wending my way from Hobart’s docks to Burnie’s hilly hinterland, via historic Kempton and the majestic highland lakes.

The whisky down here is not only first-class, it’s as good excuse as any for a ramble across some truly glorious landscape (not that you’d need one really: slainte!)

 

IMG_3384Leatherwood honey is not only unique to Tasmania, it’s ‘wild-caught’ – no agriculture involved. Leatherwood is the common name for two closely related species of tree only found growing wild in western Tasmania.

Every summer, the island’s beekeepers truck their hives into the wilderness, where the bees are let bee to do their amazing thing.

The result is the all-natural, all-organic, all-eco boxes-ticked and utterly delicious leatherwood honey.

See how it all works – amidst the photogenic wilderness of western Tasmania – in my feature in this month’s AUSTRALIAN TRAVELLER magazine.IMG_3369IMG_3325IMG_3336