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IMGP0299Way down on the west coast of Tasmania, the world’s steepest steam-train railway takes travellers through mountainous rainforest between Strahan and Queenstown.

The current issue of Australian Traveller magazine (Nov-Dec-Jan issue) features my feature on the historic West Coast Wilderness Railway. All aboard!

PS: For more Tasmanian adventures, my story about leatherwood honey (Aug-Sep-Oct 17 issue) can bee found on the world wide hive at the Australian Traveller site.

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October’s READER’S DIGEST is already hitting the newsstands. Inside, my Great Barrier Reef story outlines the impact climate change is having on the Reef.

RDAOct17coverLast year’s mass bleaching sparked a global deluge of contradictory coverage. Extreme opposites were reported, from the Reef’s ‘death’ to flat-out denials that it is in any real trouble. Hopefully this story might help to clear up the confusion by plainly describing the problem and what might be done about it.

The story is based on an interview with Dr David Wachenfeld, Director of Reef Recovery at the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority, and a visit to Heron Island Scientific Research Station on the southern Great Barrier Reef.

IMG_3384Leatherwood honey is not only unique to Tasmania, it’s ‘wild-caught’ – no agriculture involved. Leatherwood is the common name for two closely related species of tree only found growing wild in western Tasmania.

Every summer, the island’s beekeepers truck their hives into the wilderness, where the bees are let bee to do their amazing thing.

The result is the all-natural, all-organic, all-eco boxes-ticked and utterly delicious leatherwood honey.

See how it all works – amidst the photogenic wilderness of western Tasmania – in my feature in this month’s AUSTRALIAN TRAVELLER magazine.IMG_3369IMG_3325IMG_3336

IMG_6296Judy in disguise – not with glasses but with a tough covering layer of western Queensland blacksoil and 65 million years of geological change.

Judy is the latest sauropod unearthed by the Australian Age of Dinosaurs (AAOD) team. She was found on a remote sheep station this winter with a large section of cervical vertebrae (neck) pretty much in place.

Read all about AAOD’s fascinating work and how to go about joining them on a volunteer dig in my story in a recent Weekend Australian

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To shell and back – tagging turtles in the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park…

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To bee or not to bee in the Tasmanian wild west – and finding it quite a lark to mosey down Tasmania’s whisky trail

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Getting into both kinds of music at south-east Queensland’s CMC Rocks Festival…

These stories and more coming soon in reputable and august publications near YOU! Stay tuned…

The Great Barrier Reef is without doubt one of the most mind-swimmingly superlative travel destinations of our modest blue planet, and two of my favourite spots there are Heron Island and Lady Elliot Island. Here’s a travel story I did for the Sunday ‘Escape’ supplement which somehow escaped being plugged by me here, until now:

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The Weekend Australian Travel & Indulgence supplement (August 27-28, page 16 ) has my ‘Perfect 10’ column feature covering Australia’s 10 best aquatic wildlife encounters for non-divers. Plenty of cetaceans, pinnipeds and elasmobranchs. Jump in!

Link to the online version is here

 

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