IMGP0299Way down on the west coast of Tasmania, the world’s steepest steam-train railway takes travellers through mountainous rainforest between Strahan and Queenstown.

The current issue of Australian Traveller magazine (Nov-Dec-Jan issue) features my feature on the historic West Coast Wilderness Railway. All aboard!

PS: For more Tasmanian adventures, my story about leatherwood honey (Aug-Sep-Oct 17 issue) can bee found on the world wide hive at the Australian Traveller site.

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December’s edition of Reader’s Digest – out now – includes my feature article on snorkelling with whale sharks at Ningaloo Reef – click the link for an online version at the Reader’s Digest website.

Ningaloo Reef is not only one of the planet’s most spectacular coral reef systems, it’s one of the few places where these huge, highly unusual sharks can be reliably encountered.

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Whale shark filter feeling just below the surface, Ningaloo Reef, WA. Photo by David Levell.

The Ningaloo Reef whale shark story was published a few weeks ago and is still afloat here. Here’s some extra snaps from the trip:
Not whale sharks, a dolphin pod

Whale shark fleet off Tantabiddi Boat Ramp

Talking to the spotter plane

Leopard shark and 'shark spotter'

Final briefing before whale-shark dive

Whale shark at the surface

juvenile male whale shark cruises by

Intrepid Ningaloo snorkeller

Tantabiddi Boat Ramp

Three Islands Whale Shark Dive

I have a story on swimming with whale sharks in this month’s Qantas inflight magazine. Apart from the skyways, it can also be found online at Travel Insider and the Qantas website. And below, my submarine snaps of two whale sharks we encountered.

Hello... (whale shark filter-feeding)

... and goodbye

Nose to nose with an Eastern Quoll in Tasmania. They went extinct on the mainland in the 1960s, apparently – the last sighting was in Vaucluse (inner Sydney) of all places. But Bruny Island has billions of them.

They are bold little buggers, seemingly unfazed by camera flashes going off in their faces, and some even headbutted the plate-glass door.

I’m sure they would have eaten us if they had the chance.

Here’s a lenticular cloud I shot at Bruny Island (Tasmania) last week, hovering over ‘The Neck’ between North and South Bruny. Or is it a flying saucer planning inscrutable alien experiments on all those fairy penguins and muttonbirds roosting in the dunes below?

Lenticular Clouds at The Neck, Bruny Island

Sydney Harbour sunset

Here’s a link to a travel feature I’ve just had published; it’s about Sydney coastal walks – sandstone cliffs, humpback whales, Aboriginal rock art, a million beaches, that kind of thing…